Archive for June, 2012

International Neuroethics Society 2012

Abstract submissions for the 2012 International Neuroethics Society meeting in New Orleans are due JULY 2!

 The International Neuroethics Society welcomes abstracts reporting recent results in the field of neuroethics and related topics. Investigators at any career stage are encouraged to submit abstracts. Abstracts are due JULY 2.

Selections will be made based on content, available space and overall balance. Participants may submit the same abstract for the INS meeting as for the Society for Neuroscience Meeting.

Five submissions will be selected for Oral Presentations. Two submissions will receive a $250 Travel Award. Twenty-five abstracts will be published in the online version of American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience.

The deadline is 5:00 p.m. EDT on JULY 2, 2012. Submit your abstract to administrator@neuroethicssociety.org. Accepted presentations will receive notification by August 1.

For more information, click here.

Hope to see you in New Orleans!

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Is a group advocating for women leaders discriminatory?

After launching a NEW Leaders Facebook group, I was posed the following question by a concerned neuroscience graduate student.

He said:

“If the field is largely pioneered and led by women, does it need an advocacy group biased toward women? Are the aims of “cultivating professional networks and skills for women” addressing areas where women are, in fact, deficient? I remain highly skeptical of explicitly discriminatory organizations unless they are aimed at addressing issues unique to the specific group.”

I said this in response:

“Hi XXX. Thanks for your concern. While the field is largely pioneered by women, this doesn’t mean that careers in the field won’t have the same problems women and minorities have in any field (i.e. finding similar opportunities as men, being paid as well as men, being able to find social networks and resources for professional growth to name a few–please see my article discussing research about this here: https://neuroethicswomenleaders.wordpress.com/2012/06/19/pregnancydisability/). Your argument resonates with those who say we don’t need affirmative action anymore too. While it’s true that women and minorities have made much progress, we have not overcome the historical narrative that still underlies the overall under-representation of women and minorities in (sustaining) positions of leadership worldwide in any field (including neuroethics). There are many cultural norms, even some that have been adopted and integrated into our own ideology and women, that we must overcome. The truth is women and men still aren’t on equal footing.And this is why we aim to address this challenge with an advocacy group. All fields deserve scholarship informed by a diverse set of world views and, unlike what you suggest, I would hardly think a field of exclusively women is any better than field that are almost exclusively white males. I encourage you to be open to learning more about advocacy groups for women and minorities, as you may have employees and students who will need advisors who are aware of the unique challenges that face us.”

This is just one of many examples of why we need NEW Leaders. I believe this is an important question that each of us should be able to address.

What do you think?

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Welcome to New Leaders!

Welcome to our New Leaders page (Neuroethics Women Leaders)!

Neuroethics as a field is intellectually diverse including scholars from neuroscience, ethics, philosophy, psychology, law, policy, and many more disciplines. The field explores how neuroscience informs our social value systems (e.g., using brain pathology to determine culpability for crimes) as well as the neuroscientific basis of our value systems (e.g., neuroimaging of humans in moral decision making tasks).

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Women in science, is pregnancy a “disability”?

16 significant women in science for details visit: http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/

My entering class of 2002 at Emory University consisted almost entirely women with the exception of maybe 2-3 men in a large group of maybe 15 or so people. This super-sized class was a complete fluke–almost everyone who received offers from Emory chose Emory as their top pick that year to the chagrin of many fine graduate neuroscience programs. In retaliation, other schools moved their deadlines up the following year. I felt lucky to have such a large diverse class, like I had a better sampling of the population of future neuroscientists.

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