Archive for October, 2012

Does this lab coat make me look fat? Response to sexist comments made during Society for Neuroscience

 

 

Here is my response to sexist comments made during the recent Society for Neuroscience conference. “Even more troubling than Maestripieri’s adolescent wailing is how some women have tacitly accepted his subjugating rhetoric. Rebuttals in which women say that they “know plenty of beautiful female neuroscientists” or insist, “Hey, I’m not ugly!,” miss the point to such a degree that even our advocates can’t advocate for us.”  The rest can be read here. I encourage you to weigh in and share your comments here or on The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

 

 

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Join Us at International Neuroethics Society on Friday, Oct. 12 @ 530 pm.

JOIN US FOR DINNER AND DRINKS after INS on Friday, Oct 12 @ 530pm!
Our first meeting will happen immediately after the International Neuroethics Society meeting on Friday (~5:30pm) at the Palace Café, which is 0.1 miles from the INS venue at 605 Canal Street, between Chartres and Royal Streets (see map below for directions from INS). *each person will be responsible for his/her bill*

Please RSVP to Karen Rommelfanger (krommel@emory.edu) by Tues, Oct 9th at 5pm EST.

 

 

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Human enhancement and brain stimulation

Laura Cabrera, Ph.D. is a visiting postdoctoral research fellow at the Core where she is working on a project that explores the attitudes of the general public regarding cognitive enhancement. Laura Cabrera is a postdoctoral researcher in bioethics and emergent technologies in the Institute for Biomedical Ethics at Basel University. Laura received a BSc in Electrical and Communication Engineering from the Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM) in Mexico City, and a MA in Applied Ethics from Linköping University in Sweden. She received a PhD in Applied Ethics from Charles Sturt University in Australia. Laura’s current research focuses on neuroethics and emergent technologies, especially those connected to uses of neurotechnologies and individual/societal implications and perspectives.

Human enhancement has become an umbrella term to refer to a wide range of existing, emerging and visionary technological interventions that blur the boundaries between interventions aimed at therapy and those beyond therapy and species typical features, as well as interventions targeting vulnerabilities, prevention, restoration, rehabilitation, and protection from harms. Read the rest of this entry »

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