Archive for category what is neuroethics

CFA: Does Neuroscience Have Normative Implications?

Symposium of interest: Deadline for submissions Feb 1, 2016.

Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 11.11.22 AM

A symposium entitled “Does Neuroscience Have Normative Implications?” will be held at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago on April 15-16, 2016. Researchers across disciplines who are interested in this question are asked to submit abstracts of 200-400 words by February 1st, 2016 to NormativeNeuroscience@gmail.com. More information regarding abstract submission can be found here and questions can be directed to symposium organizer Geoff Holtzman at NormativeNeuroscience@gmail.com.

For more information, please see here.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Response to “Society Does Not Make Gender” by Dr. Larry Young and Brian Alexander

“A queer symbol of new gender image”by Finnish artist Susi Waegelein

*This piece was originally published on The Neuroethics Blog by Kristina Gupta.

At the beginning of August, Ruth Padawer published a piece in the New York Times magazine about gender non-conforming children and parents. Last week, Dr. Larry Young of Emory University and science writer Brian Alexander (who are publishing a book together, The Chemistry Between Us) published a response to the article, in which they argue, essentially, that gender is biologically hardwired into the brains of fetuses by the organizational effects of hormones. They go on to implicitly endorse what has been called the “brain sex theory” of transgender identity/behavior. According to this theory, hormones organize the sex/gender of the brain much later than they organize the sex/gender of the genitals, allowing for a discordance to develop between the two (Bao 2011).

Admirably, Young and Alexander use the brain sex theory to argue for an acceptance of gender non-conforming children. They write, “so rather than seeing threat, we should embrace all shades of gender, whether snips and snails, sugar and spice, or somewhere in between.” However, there are (at least) four major problems with their argument: they essentialize gender; they uncritically embrace human brain organization theory; they uncritically embrace the double-edged sword of essentialism on behalf of transgender people; and they selectively (mis)use evidence about intersex and transgender people to support an ideological claim about the innateness of gender differences.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Neuroethics–How Neuroscience Challenges our Values

Mind-reading, neuro-marketing, and neurolaw: It seems hardly a day goes by without a discussion of how new studies of the brain are challenging concepts in daily life as we know it. Neuroscience is now influencing how we think about every aspect of our lives from identity, (animal) personhood, and definitions of disease to the law, and marketing of novel commercial products. Dr. Karen Rommelfanger, neuroscientist and Program Director of Emory University’s Neuroethics Program, gives insights into the field of neuroethics and the wide-reaching ethical and social implications of neuroscience and neurotechnologies.

–originally featured on Emory University Center for Ethics Blog

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Welcome to New Leaders!

Welcome to our New Leaders page (Neuroethics Women Leaders)!

Neuroethics as a field is intellectually diverse including scholars from neuroscience, ethics, philosophy, psychology, law, policy, and many more disciplines. The field explores how neuroscience informs our social value systems (e.g., using brain pathology to determine culpability for crimes) as well as the neuroscientific basis of our value systems (e.g., neuroimaging of humans in moral decision making tasks).

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

Leave a comment